PRE-CONFERENCE PROGRAMS

Jumpstart your PAS experience on Friday with special sessions targeted toward trainees, fellows, and career development. PAS provides a variety of high-quality educational, career-developmental, and collaborative opportunities to help you make the most of your meeting experience. The focus of Friday’s pre-conference programming creates opportunities for PAS Partner and Alliance societies to continue growing the pediatric research pipeline and to feature their career development initiatives.

*All PAS Friday Ticketed events can be purchased during the PAS registration process. If you have already registered, you may return to your registration and add additional ticketed events.

Already registered and want to add these events? No problem—just update your registration (refer to your registration confirmation email.) 

PAS Fellow Core Curriculum Workshop

Friday, April 28, 2023 | 8:00 am – 1:30 pm local time
$175US per track (includes box lunch)

Three tracks with three sessions (90 minutes each). The sessions will focus on skill and knowledge acquisition to provide a comprehensive core curriculum for fellows that address areas of academic development identified in the American Board of Pediatrics Guidelines for Fellowship Training. The topics covered are appropriate for individuals at the fellowship level of training and provide a foundation for those who may not have had exposure to some required topics, as well as those who wish to pursue a topic in greater depth in the future. It is intended that these themes will repeat each year so individual curriculums can be created to complement education provided by local fellowship training programs.

CME upon completion

Fellows Core Curriculum Workshop - Track I

Fellows Core Curriculum Workshop – Track I

8:00 am: Writing Your First Paper – How To Make Sure It Gets Accepted 

Writing your first paper is a challenge. In this session, we will discuss how to get started – from properly formatting a draft to selecting the right journal. We will review all aspects of a paper, including the abstract, introduction, methods, results, discussion, tables, figures, and references. Authorship issues and how to help reviewers appreciate the importance of your paper will be discussed. Peer-reviewed papers are an important ingredient in academic success. At the end of this session, the goal is to ensure that you will be more comfortable submitting your first paper.

9:30 am: Break 

9:45 am: Fundamentals of Quality Improvement: How to Do QI

This session will be helpful to those participating in or planning quality improvement/patient safety projects, but who have little to modest experience or training in QI science. The session will include a survey of common over-arching QI methodologies (eg, lean engineering, the model for improvement, process control), specific QI strategies (eg, standardization, error-proofing, checklists, iterative PDSAs), issues around quality measures (eg, outcome measures, process measures, balancing measures), and a very brief introduction into broad but related concepts (eg, scoping, high-reliability organizations, safety culture). Small groups will take example quality/safety problems, explore possible QI approaches, plan interventions and interpret mock data. Participants will be encouraged to see how particular problems may suggest very fitting QI approaches, just as a particular QI approach may suggest very fitting analytic methods.

11:15 am: Lunch Break (box lunch provided) 

12:00 pm: Effective, Efficient, and Innovative Teaching as a Fellow

With increasing pressures to learn the knowledge, skills, and other competencies required for fellowship training, the teaching of medical students and residents has the tendency to become less of a priority at this level of training. Yet fellows are frequently called upon to teach trainees in the inpatient and outpatient settings. Effective, efficient, and innovative teaching strategies are needed, and this workshop will provide attendees with such strategies. A variety of teaching techniques including the use of ‘trigger’ videotapes, live demonstrations, and discussion will be used to highlight key take-home concepts that are designed to improve the teaching skills of participants.

1:30 pm: Closing

Core Curriculum Fellows Workshop - Track II

Core Curriculum Fellows Workshop – Track II

8:00 am: From Idea to Implementation: Navigating the Ethical Landscape of Pediatric Clinical Research

This session will explore the challenges in designing and implementing a pediatric clinical research protocol using case studies (with participant analysis and discussion) to illustrate the following topics: What are the appropriate limits of risk exposure to a child if the intervention does not offer any prospect of direct benefit? What data are necessary to establish whether there is a sufficient prospect of direct benefit to justify the risks of an intervention? How does one design and assess a protocol that contains multiple interventions and procedures? How should one approach obtain child assent and parental permission for research participation based on the developmental age of the child? By the end of the session, participants will be familiar with key concepts in pediatric research ethics, including minimal risk, a minor increase over minimal risk, component analysis, the prospect of direct benefit, and extrapolation. Ideally, participants should come prepared with a hypothetical clinical research idea, including an intervention, patient population, and endpoints, so that the material can be applied in the discussion to a relevant example drawn from personal clinical and/or research experience.

9:30 am: Break

9:45 am: Recognizing Common Bio-statistical Errors

Fellows must be aware of bio-statistical errors in the literature. Recognition will help researchers prevent similar errors in their own scientific work. Case vignettes will be used to highlight common errors. The errors discussed may include standard error vs. standard deviation, non-independence, use of paired measurements, the meaning of P-values, and confidence intervals.

11:15 am: Lunch Break (box lunch provided)

12:00 pm: Grant Writing – Key Components and Strategies for Success

Grant writing is a critical skill for many fellows and faculty. While the details of funding applications vary, there are many common elements across funding sources and shared strategies for success. The objectives of the session are 1) to demystify the grant application process; 2) to identify potential funding sources for new investigators; 3) to consider key components of grant applications, and 4) to discuss strategies for success.

1:30 pm: Closing

Core Curriculum Fellows Workshop - Track III

Core Curriculum Fellows Workshop – Track III

8:00 am: Finding Your Passion and Your Purpose

What gets you out of bed in the morning? or keeps you up at night? In this interactive session, we will prompt you to think and reflect on what motivates you. By the end of the session, you will have a better sense of how to cultivate passion through purposeful action in your career as a pediatric specialist.

9:30 am: Break

9:45  am: Negotiation 101

Congratulations! You are finishing a fellowship and have just been offered a new job. You are about to meet with your future boss to discuss your position. Now, what happens? The reality is that for most of us, we have no idea. As clinicians, most of us were never taught the basics of how to negotiate. Negotiation 101 will introduce you to some of these nuts-and-bolts skills. First, workshop participants will pair off and negotiate a deal. We will then regroup and see how everyone did. We’ll use this exercise to introduce some basic negotiation concepts BATNA, ZOPA, and reservation value. We’ll also try to answer the question of “is it better to make the first offer or respond to a first offer?” (Answer – it depends). We will then take the lessons learned from the negotiation exercise and apply them to the academic medical setting. We’ll try to cover questions such as “What is negotiable and what isn’t?” and “What are the things that I don’t even know to discuss or to ask for?” Finally, we’ll end the workshop by doing a few self-reflection exercises to help figure out what one may want out of a career. Knowing what you actually want is the first (and possibly most important step) in the negotiation process.

11:15 am: Lunch Break (box lunch provided)

12:00 pm: Having Difficult Conversations

During this presentation, participants will be introduced to basic principles of verbal and non-verbal communication, conflict resolution techniques, and a structured process to help them understand how to approach difficult conversations and negotiations.

1:30 pm: Closing

PAS 2023 Postgraduate Courses

PAS Postgraduate Courses cover basic, translational, and clinical science from fetal physiology to post-discharge follow-up. Speakers will discuss current research advances, provide ideas for the development of research or quality improvement projects, and address career development in their presentations.

Target Audience:
Neonatal fellows, junior faculty, associate professors, and scientists interested in hearing the latest research and developing skills to advance their research careers in a collegial, interactive format.

CME upon completion

Neonatal Pulmonology and Resuscitation: Surfactant Biology and Management of RDS

Friday, April 28 | 7:00 am – 1:30 pm local time
$175US (includes boxed lunch)

Neonatal Pulmonology and Resuscitation: Surfactant Biology and Management of RDS

Neonatal Pulmonology and Resuscitation: Surfactant Biology and Management of RDS

Session Description
A postgraduate course focusing on what is known about the surfactant system and some new ideas that illustrate there is much we do not know. The course will also include some of the recent advances in surfactant delivery and recommendations. Dr. Susan Guttentag (Vanderbilt) will start with a detailed overview: Surfactant Biology, Lamellar Body, and Surfactant Protein B Fundamentals. Several speakers will discuss some new advances in basic surfactant biology examining novel pathways (Epithelial GPR116, Jim Bridges, (NJH Denver) & Natriuretic Peptide Pathway (Rita Ryan (Case Western Reserve Univ). Updates on Surfactant Protein C, and ABCA3 biology, representing two common abnormalities in lung disease, will be provided by Michael Beers (Penn) and Jennifer Wambach (Wash U), respectively. Dr. Larry Nogee (JHU) will present on what the latest practice for Genetic testing for neonates with atypical RDS: A practical approach. Turning to some clinical data, Dr. Beena Sood (Wayne St Univ) will present her work on Phospholipid changes in clinical gastric aspirates. Short talks on the effects of maternal diabetes on the surfactant system (Hilal Yildiz Atar, Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital), Non-invasive Surfactant Delivery – Introducing LISA into your NICU (Allison Osborne (CCF) and SALSA: Surfactant Administration through Laryngeal or Supraglottic Airways (Kari Roberts, UMN) to improve clinical opportunities. Finally, two senior physician-scientists will round out the program by discussing the recent national guidelines for the use of surfactant for RDS ((Vineet Bhandari, Cooper Univ) and Surfactant use in non-RDS patients (Satyan Laskshminrusimha).

Learning Objectives

  1. Know the latest information about the surfactant system
  2. Know when to request genomic testing for neonates with lung disease
  3. Know the most current national guidelines for using surfactant for RDS

Target Audience: Neonatologists, Pediatric Pulmonologists, Basic Scientists, Fellows, Junior Faculty, Associate Professors, and Scientists interested in surfactant biology and the clinical management of respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants.

Moderators: Rita M. Ryan, MD, and Vineet Bhandari, MD, DM

7:00 am: Surfactant Biology, Lamellar Body and Surfactant Protein B Fundamentals Susan H. Guttentag, MD

7:45 am: Epithelial GPR116 regulates pulmonary alveolar homeostasis via Gq/11 signaling, James Bridges, PhD

8:15 am: Role of Natriuretic Peptide C Receptor in surfactant secretion, Rita M. Ryan, MD

8:45 am: What’s New in Surfactant Protein C Biology, Michael Beers, MD

9:15 am: What’s so special about ABCA3? Jennifer Wambach, MD, MS

9:45 am: Genetic testing for neonates with atypical RDS: A practical approach, Lawrence M. Nogee, MD

10:15 am: Phospholipid changes in clinical gastric aspirates, Beena G. Sood, MD, MS

10:45 am: The effects of maternal diabetes on the surfactant system and RDS, Hilal Yildiz Atar, MD

11:05 am: Non-invasive Surfactant Delivery � Introducing LISA into your NICU, Allison O. Ignatz-Hoover, MD

11:25 am – 12:00 pm Lunch

12:00 pm: SALSA: Surfactant Administration through Laryngeal or Supraglottic Airways, Kari Roberts, MD

12:20 pm: Results from RDS-NeXT: Now we know what to do! Vineet Bhandari, MD, DM

12:50 pm: Surfactant use in non-RDS patients, Satyan Lakshminrusimha, MD FAAP

1:20 pm Close of session

Neonatal Genetics: Genomics in Newborn Care

Friday, April 28 | 7:00 am – 1:30 pm local time
$175US (includes boxed lunch)

Neonatal Genetics: Genomics in Newborn Care

Neonatal Genetics: Genomics in Newborn Care

Target Audience
Neonatologists, Geneticists, Genetic counselors, NICU Fellows, Junior Faculty, Associate Professors, and Scientists interested in developing their understanding and skills to advance their research career in Neonatal Genomics

Session Description
A postgraduate course focusing on the implementation of genomic care in newborns and the available clinical, translational, and research opportunities. The course will cover the entire spectrum of applications of genomic medicine in newborns. In addition to an overview, we will cover various aspects of genomics including the need for rapid sequencing, cost-effectiveness, the genetic basis of various neonatal conditions, implementation experience in the NICU, and ethical, legal, and social implications and issues of diversity and equity.

Learning Objectives

  1. Upon completion, participants will be able to understand how genomic applications can improve the care of newborns, especially in the NICUs.
  2. Upon completion, participants will be able to determine the role of rapid sequencing in the NICU, the genetic basis of various neonatal conditions, and research opportunities.
  3. Upon completion, participants will be able to learn about implementation experience, its cost-effectiveness, ethical, legal, and social implications, and issues of diversity and equity in genomic applications.

Moderators: Pankaj b. Agrawal, MD MMSC and Lawrence M. Nogee, MD 

7:00 am: An overview of genomic care in newborns, Pankaj b. Agrawal, MD MMSC

7:20 am: Q&A

7:30 am: Southseq: an NIH-funded study of sequencing newborns, Bruce R. Korf, MD, PhD

7:50 am: Q&A

8:00 am: Implementing genomic care in a Level 4 NICU, Tara L. Wenger, MD, PhD

8:20 am: Q&A

8:30 am: Blessings and pitfalls of genetic testing in Newborns, Rita M. Ryan, MD

8:50 am: Q&A

9:00 am: Role of genomic sequencing in newborn screening, Ingrid A. Holm, MD, MPH

9:20 am: Q&A

9:30 am: Genetic basis of congenital cardiac defects, Sarah U. Morton, MD PhD

9:50 am: Q&A

10:00 am: Genetic basis of neonatal lung conditions and gene therapy approach to congenital surfactant deficiency, Jennifer Wambach, MD, MS

10:20 am: Q&A

10:30 am: Genetic basis of prematurity, Louis Muglia, MD, PhD

10:50 am: Q&A

11:00 am: Lunch

12:00 pm: Ethical, social and legal implications in implementing newborn genomic care, Monica H. Wojcik, MD MPH FAAP FACMG

12:20 pm: Q&A

12:30 pm: Resolving racial, equity, and diversity issues in genomics, Tamorah R. Lewis, MD, PhD

12:50 pm: Q&A

1:00 pm: Rapid genome sequencing and cost-effectiveness, Nathaly Sweeney, MD, MPH, MS

1:20 pm: Q&A

1:30 pm: Close of session

Neonatal Neurology: Better than expected: Neurodevelopment and follow-up of NICU infants for the next half-century

Friday, April 28 | 8:00 am – 1:30 pm local time
$175US (includes boxed lunch)

Neonatal Neurology: Better than expected: Neurodevelopment and follow-up of NICU infants for the next half-century

Neonatal Neurology: Better than expected: Neurodevelopment and follow-up of NICU infants for the next half-century

Session Description
This postgraduate course will discuss our recent advancements in improving neurodevelopmental outcomes in NICU graduates. Speakers will address how neonatal neuroimaging helps us to improve counseling, monitoring, and neurodevelopmental outcomes through the NICU follow-up clinic. Through real-world experiences, we will address the impact of social determinants of health and adversity on neurodevelopmental outcomes, and discuss new models of care to enable NICU follow-up clinics to improve neurodevelopmental outcomes of NICU graduates for the next half-century. Bot didactic and interactive methods will be used to optimize learning and discussion between session participants.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify advances to date in monitoring and improving motor and cognitive outcomes in the NICU follow-up clinic.
  2. Utilize neonatal neuroimaging to better guide improved surveillance, counseling, and intervention for NICU graduates in the NICU follow-up clinic.
  3. Identify key considerations for improving neurodevelopmental outcomes in the next half-century, including considerations of social determinants of health, adversity, and resilience.

Target Audience
Neurologists, Neonatologists, Developmental Pediatricians, Psychologists, and Trainees

Moderators: Emily W. Tam, MDCM, MAS, FRCPC, and Nathalie Maitre, MD, PhD

8:0am: Introduction, Emily W. Tam, MDCM, MAS, FRCPC

8:10 am: Surveillance and intervention to improve motor outcomes, Nathalie Maitre, MD, PhD

8:35 am: Resilience in outcomes of NICU graduates, Mary Lauren Neel, MD, MSCI

9:00 am: Brain imaging to improve outcomes in newborns with congenital heart disease, Steven Miller, MDCM MAS FRPC

9:25 am: Q&A

9:45 am: Break

10:00 am: Harnessing neuroimaging to guide our practice: an interactive review, Mehmet Cizmeci, MD, PhD

10:40 am: Improving neonatal follow-up locally through statewide collaboration: lessons from California, Elizabeth Rogers, MD

11:05 am – Lunch break

11:50 am: Addressing social determinants of health and adversity, Yvette Johnson, MD, MPH

12:15 pm:
New models of care for neonatal follow-up, Jonathan Litt, MD, MPH, ScD

12:40 pm-1:30 pm: Interactive Panel Discussion

1:30 pm: Close of Session

Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury (AKI): From Basic and Clinical Science to Caring for Baby (and their beans) in the crib

Friday, April 28 | 7:00 am – 1:30 pm local time
$175US (includes boxed lunch)

Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury (AKI): From Basic and Clinical Science to Caring for Baby (and their beans) in the crib.

Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury (AKI): From Basic and Clinical Science to Caring for Baby (and their beans) in the crib. 

Session Description
The course will cover basic, translational, and clinical science from fetal physiology to post-discharge follow-up for neonatal AKI. The course is designed to deliver an overview of current research advances and clinical practice strategies in neonatal AKI, including the use of kidney support therapies in neonates in a variety of settings (ECMO, multiorgan failure, AKI, etc.) The speakers will aim to help foster ideas for future research, quality improvement projects, and improved care.

Learning Objectives

  1. Upon completion, participants will understand neonatal kidney function, the pathophysiology of neonatal AKI, the impact of prematurity, and the long-term implications of neonatal AKI.
  2. Upon completion, participants will understand the definition of neonatal AKI, the risk factors associated with neonatal AKI, and the epidemiology & impact of neonatal AKI.
  3. Learners will be exposed to state-of-the-art topics: novel AKI biomarkers, neonatal ECMO &nephrology (AKI, fluid balance, kidney support therapy (KST)), and neonatal KST.

Target Audience
Neonatology, Nephrology

Basic Science & Translational Science
Moderators: Alison Kent BMBS, FRACP, MD, Meredith Schuh, MD

7:00 am: Nephron Endowment and its impact on long-term health. The link between prematurity, AKI, and risk for CKD, Jennifer Charlton, MD, MSc

7:30 am: Q&A

7:35 am: Neonatal Kidney Function: What happens before birth, after birth, and when the kidney gets injured? Matthew Harer, MD

8:05 am: Q&A

8:10 am: Pathophysiology of Neonatal Acute Kidney Injury: AKI is more than a rise in serum creatinine: it’s a multisystem disease, Danielle Soranno, MD

8:40 am: Q&A

8:45 am: Can urine biomarkers help us care for neonates? Using translational science to identify biomarkers and therapeutic targets, Prasad Devarajan, MD, FAAP, FASN

9:15 am: Q&A

9:20 am: Break

Clinical Science
Moderators: Jeff Segar, MD, and Keia Sanderson, MD

9:30 am: AKI definition, incidence, and outcomes, Jennifer Jetton, MD

9:55 am: The impact of fluid balance on outcomes in neonates, Michelle Starr, MD, MPH

10:20 am: Acute kidney injury, kidney support therapy, and fluid balance management for neonates on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, David Selewski, MD, MSCR

10:45 am: Q&A

11:00 am: Lunch

12:00 pm: Care of the neonate with fluid overload and acute kidney injury, David Askenazi, MD, MSPH

12:25 pm: Neonatal Kidney support therapy Part 1: the neonatologist perspective, Cara Slagle, MD

12:50 pm: Neonatal Kidney support therapy Part 2: the nephrologist perspective, Shina Menon, MD

1:15 pm: Q&A

1:30 pm: Close of Session

SPS Sedation Provider CourseTM A Simulation Experience

Friday | April 28, 2023
10:00 am – 1:00 pm local time (Three sessions of 60 minutes each)
$35 US

Course Directors: Corrie Chumpitazi MD MS FAAP FACEP, Molly Childers MD, Anna Lin MD FAAP, Normaliz Rodriguez MD, Maala Bhatt MD, Mary Landrigan-Ossar MD PhD

The Sedation Provider CourseTM is a simulation-based course that is focused on knowledge and skill acquisition crucial to the safe and effective provision of procedural sedation in children. Patient pre-procedural assessment, sedative pharmacology, recognition/management of sedation-related adverse events, recovery, and discharge are reviewed. The topics covered are appropriate for multidisciplinary individuals at the fellowship level of training/who have completed fellowship training in PEM, PHM, PCCM, or equivalent as well as advanced practice providers or physician’s assistants who are interested in learning about procedural sedation or expanding their skills.

CME upon completion

10:00 am -11:00 am: Session 1: Airway skills and management techniques Normaliz Rodriguez, MD

Session 1 – Airway skills and management techniques Normaliz Rodriguez, MD

Includes 2 interactive SIMULATION scenario sessions (30 minutes each).

Each SIM scenario is case-based and focused on adverse events commonly encountered during procedural sedation.

11:00 am - 12:00 pm: Session 2: Hands-on Sedation Scenarios Anna Lin, MD

Session 2 – Hands-on Sedation Scenarios Anna Lin, MD

Includes 2 interactive workshops (30 minutes each)

  1. Tailoring Sedation – Putting it all together! This session focuses on matching patient needs with procedural needs and deriving an analgesic-sedative regimen.

Airway Workshop – Practice basic and advanced airway skills! Crucial elements of basic and advanced airway support include airway adjuncts, bag, and mask ventilation as well as placement of LMA and ETT.

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm: Session 3 - Hands-on Sedation Scenarios Molly Childers, Childers, MD

Session 3 – Hands-on Sedation Scenarios Molly Childers, Childers, MD

Includes 2 interactive SIMULATION scenario sessions (30 minutes each).

Each SIM scenario is case-based and focused on adverse events commonly encountered during procedural sedation.

Independently planned Academic Pediatric Association (APA)  Pre-Conference Events – During PAS Pre-Conference Days 

APA Fellows Meeting
Pediatric Academic Generalist & Hospital Medicine Fellows Meeting
Thursday, April 27, 2023

APA Quality Improvement Conference
12th Annual Conference
Friday, April 28, 2023